Monthly Archives: September 2011

World-first discovery ‘can help save coral reefs’

An international team of scientists has achieved a major breakthrough in fishing sustainability on coral reefs which could play a vital role in preventing their collapse. “Fishermen and scientists have long wondered how many fish can be taken off a reef before it collapses,” Dr Nick Graham of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral […] … learn more→

A heart of gold

A team of researchers at MIT and Children’s Hospital Boston has built cardiac patches studded with tiny gold wires that could be used to create pieces of tissue whose cells all beat in time, mimicking the dynamics of natural heart muscle. The development could someday help people who have suffered heart attacks. The study, reported […] … learn more→

University teaching is based on research

At a first glance, university teaching seems like any other teaching, but a closer analysis shows that university teaching is closely related to research and knowledge development. For many young persons, the main aim of their studies is to receive a professional title and thus a certain kind of job. This is not so strange, […] … learn more→

The changing face of the job interview

The first interview with a potential employer is where you can make your mark. People form first impressions quickly, and if you are able to make a good one, it can only work in your favor. While much of the conventional wisdom about interview strategies remains the same, the actual interview process has been advancing […] … learn more→

Mistrust behind inevitable failure of Middle East peace

New research concludes Middle East peace negotiations are bound to fail, no matter how robust the system of negotiation, because the crucial issue of trust remains unresolved. Victoria University dispute resolution expert Professor John Zeleznikow said negotiation support systems could be used to reach outcomes acceptable to both parties in disputes ranging from divorce to […] … learn more→

Salty water and gas sucked into Earth’s interior helps unravel planetary evolution

An international team of scientists has provided new insights into the processes behind the evolution of the planet by demonstrating how salty water and gases transfer from the atmosphere into the Earth’s interior. The paper was published today in Nature Geoscience. Scientists have long argued about how the Earth evolved from a primitive state in […] … learn more→

Amphibians: Beware young Beetles\’ deadly \”siren call\”

Ground beetles can immobilize and devour amphibian prey many times their size. Now Gil Wizen, a graduate student of Tel Aviv University\’s Department of Zoology, has discovered that they have an additional advantage — the larvae of these beetles, like their fully grown adult counterparts, have a unique method for luring and feeding off amphibians. […] … learn more→

DNA confirms existence of NZ bird thought extinct

An examination of ancient and modern DNA by the University of Otago has confirmed that the New Zealand storm-petrel, once thought to be extinct, is a bird which continues to fly our southern skies. University of Otago Senior Lecturer in Zoology Dr Bruce Robertson, who led the study, says the research confirms that the storm […] … learn more→