Tag Archives: University rankings

Rethinking university rankings: we need to talk about quality (and inequality) of teaching

Rethinking university rankings: we need to talk about quality (and inequality) of teaching

Each year the release of the Times Higher Education World University Rankings generates a great deal of interest, excitement – and debate. This year all eyes are on China which, according to the 2018 rankings, “steps up its ascent” as “East closes in on West”. China’s Tsinghua University in 22nd place has overtaken all of its other […] … learn more→

University rankings: how do they compare and what do they mean for students?

University rankings: how do they compare and what do they mean for students?

University rankings can be highly influential. They can help prospective students to narrow down their choice of institution and, of course, they also give universities something to brag about. The UK’s elite institutions, Oxford and Cambridge, continue to occupy the top two posts in the latest Times Higher Education World University Rankings And many other UK universities […] … learn more→

Grading Higher Education: When worlds collide

Grading Higher Education: When worlds collide

One of the most persistent problems facing American higher education is how best to explain its importance and endearing value to the public. The problem is that various perspectives shape the approach utilized. Higher education leadership – especially at the research universities and the liberal arts colleges – often speak to the need for America […] … learn more→

World University rankings — Time for a name change?

I\’ve often wondered if the term \’World University Rankings\’ — the one deployed by the firm QS in its QS World University Rankings®, or TSL Education Ltd along with Thomson Reuters, in their Times Higher Education World University Rankings, is an accurate and indeed ethical one to use. My concern over the term was heightened […] … learn more→

Made to measure? Why university rankings are flawed

An unwritten law has emerged in both the sciences and social sciences – that it is better to measure than not to measure. Perhaps our affinity to measurement is attributable to Galileo who is purported to have said count what is countable, measure what is measurable and, what is not measurable, make measurable. In a […] … learn more→

Towards a global common data set for world university rankers

Last month marked another burst of developments in the world university rankings sector, including two ‘under 50’ rankings. More specifically: • 29 May 2012: QS launches QS Top 50 Under 50 • 31 May 2012: Times Higher Education (with Thomson Reuters) launches THE 100 Under 50 A coincidence? Very unlikely. But who was first with […] … learn more→