Tag Archives: writing

Getting to grips with ‘the paragraph’

Getting to grips with ‘the paragraph’

I was recently asked how I felt about paragraphs. “Well you know, all the feels” I might have replied. But I didn’t, largely because I don’t usually think about the paragraph. The question made me wonder whether I take the paragraph for granted. Paragraphs sit way below my consciousness a lot of the time. But […] … learn more→

How to improve your writing skills?

How to improve your writing skills?

Decent writing skills may say a lot about you as a person and an employee. From that point of view, your career might rest on how good you can write. Inconsistent texts of your reports, emails and just ordinary messages in social networks or communication apps distort your professional image. Whether you are writing a […] … learn more→

Should we really write daily?

Should we really write daily?

The most cited work in the field of ‘academic writing productivity’ is that of Robert Boice from the 1990s. Is it that because there’s been no further research in this area or has nobody bettered his findings? We’ve just launched our own study into academic writing practice. It’s research that we hope will give anyone who needs […] … learn more→

How to write (and publish) like a pro

How to write (and publish) like a pro

Academic conferences can be full of networking opportunities and professional wisdom. For me, last month’s Society for the Study of Social Problems international conference was brimful of both. I had the privilege to attend talks given by prolific scholars and senior editors from across the country. I also had the opportunity to have one-on-one conversations […] … learn more→

A two week book chapter – a.k.a. down the writing burrow

A two week book chapter – a.k.a. down the writing burrow

  I’ve just written a book chapter in two weeks. This is a long time for me, and it was hard work. I’m usually someone who plans their writing quite carefully. I begin with an abstract and then flesh it out by adding bullet points. I don’t do pomodoros, or any other form of speed writing. […] … learn more→

Reasons to write

Reasons to write

I’ve been dipping in and out of a rather pleasurable book about writing. Most people read books about writing for utilitarian reasons – to find a new technique, to see something that might inform their own work, to seek explanations for particular conventions. And so on. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with these kinds of informative writing […] … learn more→

How (not) to write: nine more tips for academics in the humanities

How (not) to write: nine more tips for academics in the humanities

After the publication of “How Not to Write”, my number of Twitter followers soared to 195. The internet called me a racist and sexist “mansplainer” vying for a seat in Donald Trump’s cabinet. With the election fast approaching, the moment seemed right for part two – to secure my seat in a Trump White House. […] … learn more→

Coping with writing anxiety – or – learn to stroke your spider

Coping with writing anxiety – or – learn to stroke your spider

Desensitisation is a psychological term. It is used to describe a process through which a very anxious – perhaps even phobic – person gradually becomes used to the object or situation which makes them afraid. Professional support is often required for effective desensitisation. Desensitisation usually consists of three steps – developing a fear hierarchy, relaxation […] … learn more→

Sift and sort – a revision strategy for a problem paper

Sift and sort – a revision strategy for a problem paper

Those of you who like to work with material stuff, moving actual objects around, might want to try to this revision strategy. It’s not too dissimilar to the computer based version, but here you get to use paper and scissors. 1. Write the main point that you want to make, your take home message, onto a […] … learn more→

Turn off email, put your phone into airplane mode, and write

Turn off email, put your phone into airplane mode, and write

I am currently writing this in the final “pomodoro” of a one-day writing retreat. Earlier in the year, and from Twitter, I had seen that my friend John Flood was on a two-day writing retreat with his Griffith University Law School colleagues. It looked fun, and, and perhaps more importantly, like he (and his colleagues) […] … learn more→