Monthly Archives: January 2011

Non-alcoholic energy drinks may pose \’high\’ health risks

Highly-caffeinated energy drinks – even those containing no alcohol – may pose a significant threat to individuals and public health, say researchers at the University of Maryland School of Public Health and Wake Forest University School of Medicine. In a new online commentary in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), they recommend immediate […] … learn more→

Mathematical model could help predict and prevent future extinctions

In an effort to better understand the dynamics of complex networks, scientists have developed a mathematical model to describe interactions within ecological food webs. This research, performed by Northwestern University physics professor Adilson Motter and his student, Sagar Sahasrabudhe, is published in the January 25 issue of Nature Communications. The work illustrates how human intervention […] … learn more→

World on the Edge: Quick Facts

We are facing issues of near-overwhelming complexity and unprecedented urgency. Can we think systemically and fashion policies accordingly? Can we change direction before we go over the edge? Here are a few of the many facts from the book to consider: … learn more→

Scientists find that debris on certain Himalayan glaciers may prevent melting

A new scientific study shows that debris coverage –– pebbles, rocks, and debris from surrounding mountains –– may be a missing link in the understanding of the decline of glaciers. Debris is distinct from soot and dust, according to the scientists. Melting of glaciers in the Himalayan Mountains affects water supplies for hundreds of millions […] … learn more→

Weight loss plus walking essential for older, obese adults

Walking more and losing weight can improve mobility as much as 20 percent in older, obese adults with poor cardiovascular health, according to a new Wake Forest University study. The results from the five-year study of 288 participants appear online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The combination of weight loss and physical […] … learn more→

Purdue team creates \’engineered organ\’ model for breast cancer research

Purdue University researchers have reproduced portions of the female breast in a tiny slide-sized model dubbed \”breast on-a-chip\” that will be used to test nanomedical approaches for the detection and treatment of breast cancer. The model mimics the branching mammary duct system, where most breast cancers begin, and will serve as an \”engineered organ\” to […] … learn more→