Tag Archives: Open Access

Academics must become more engaged in the open access struggle

Academics must become more engaged in the open access struggle

The University of California’s recent negotiations with Elsevier achieved a better deal for researchers than was initially given to them when they walked away in 2018. After a two-year standoff, during which academics at the multi-campus system had no direct access to paywalled Elsevier content, the publisher largely bowed to California’s demand to cut overall costs while allowing California […] … learn more→

Plan S will be a catastrophe for learned societies

Plan S will be a catastrophe for learned societies

A spectre is haunting arts and humanities scholarship: the consequences of open access. Policy decisions are being taken now, but within the next three to four years, these missteps are likely to have profoundly harmed entire disciplines and possibly wiped out some of our most cherished learned societies. Given the huge pressures faced by academics […] … learn more→

Covid-19 underlines the need for full open access

Covid-19 underlines the need for full open access

The fight against Covid-19 has illuminated the value of rapid and borderless access to research. But while most coronavirus studies were commendably made freely available to all, it remains a different matter for much of the world’s publicly funded university research. Change is possible, however. Publishers, research institutions and their funders are now working together […] … learn more→

We must not sacrifice accuracy for publication speed

We must not sacrifice accuracy for publication speed

Open access (OA) has been the defining story of academic publishing for the past 15 years. The discourse has changed from whether to move to OA to how to move and, now, how fast to move. On the launch of Plan S in 2018, Science Europe president Marc Schiltz stated that “progress has been slow” […] … learn more→

The open-access monograph conundrum can be solved

The open-access monograph conundrum can be solved

The pandemic year has been odd for open-access (OA) policy. The shutdowns of libraries worldwide illustrated brutally the fragility of our access to research but also the power of open access, with many publishers scrambling to “unpaywall” the research they publish. Open access looked like the future. At the same time, however, the plague gutted […] … learn more→

‘Transformative’ open access publishing deals are only entrenching commercial power

‘Transformative’ open access publishing deals are only entrenching commercial power

Plan S has already been credited with sparking something of a revolution in journal publishing. Major publishers are beginning – slowly and reluctantly in some cases – to replace their traditional “big deals” with what are being called “transformative deals”. Often negotiated with national consortia of libraries and research institutes, these combine access to subscription […] … learn more→

Open access will curtail profits but not quality or freedom

Open access will curtail profits but not quality or freedom

Subscription publishers’ responses to last week’s landmark announcement on open access by a dozen major European research funders was nothing if not predictable. Doom and gloom forecasts abounded about the end of quality science publishing, coupled with protestations that funders have no right to mandate author choices. All this is recycled nonsense. The funders – […] … learn more→

Open access in Germany: the best DEAL is no deal

Open access in Germany: the best DEAL is no deal

In the worldwide campaign to shift academic publishing to open access, the Germans are fighting a major battle. To many, they look like heroes. “Projekt DEAL” is the name of a German national consortium that includes university libraries and scientific organisations. The consortium has been working towards an agreement with Elsevier that, if the Germans […] … learn more→

What open-access publishing actually costs

What open-access publishing actually costs

In academe, ideas cost money. But how much? Advocates for open-access journals say that academic research should be free for everyone to read. But even those proponents acknowledge that publishing costs money — the disagreement is over the amount. The issue was highlighted last month, when all six editors and all 31 editorial-board members resigned […] … learn more→