Tag Archives: Humanities

If we want brilliant English, history or geography teachers, why are we making humanities courses so costly?

If we want brilliant English, history or geography teachers, why are we making humanities courses so costly?

The government’s university funding reform package passed the lower house in early September and will pass the Senate if the Coalition succeeds in garnering enough crossbench support. The plan would see fees for some humanities degrees rise by as much as 113%, while fees for courses in fields such as teaching, nursing and STEM (science, technology, engineering […] … learn more→

If the government listened to business leaders, they would encourage humanities education, not pull funds from it

If the government listened to business leaders, they would encourage humanities education, not pull funds from it

The federal government’s announcement they will more than double the cost of humanities and communications degrees for university students has taken the sector by surprise – not least because it goes against increasing evidence that these programs are the key to our nation’s future success. If the government wants to support university courses that lead to jobs, […] … learn more→

Humanities graduates earn more than those who study science and maths

Humanities graduates earn more than those who study science and maths

Education minister Dan Tehan has announced changes to funding rates for university courses as part of a plan to create “job ready graduates”. He said: Projections prepared before the COVID-19 pandemic showed that over the five years to 2024 it is expected that the overwhelming majority of new jobs will require tertiary qualifications – and almost half […] … learn more→

Why science needs the humanities to solve climate change

Why science needs the humanities to solve climate change

Large wildfires in the Arctic and intense heat waves in Europe are just the latest evidence that climate change is becoming the defining event of our time. Unlike other periods that came and went, such as the 1960s or the dot-com boom, an era of unchecked climate change will lead to complex and irreversible changes in Earth’s life support systems. Many […] … learn more→

Why doing Humanities is doing science

Why doing Humanities is doing science

It is increasingly common in this society or, at least, in this country, to divide the intellectuals – and their students – into two great branches of knowledge: letters and sciences, as if the former were not scientific and the latter not they would have a certain domain of humanistic knowledge that has led us […] … learn more→

How do we define student success in the Humanities?

How do we define student success in the Humanities?

I’ve been thinking a lot about the phrase “student success.” I like the way it pushes us to define our terms and ask questions about metrics: What does student success look like? How do you know that what you’re doing will make your students successful? How do you measure whether they are successful? We do […] … learn more→

To save the Humanities, change the narrative

In the classic children’s story Chicken Little, the main character feels an acorn drop on her head and infers from this that the sky is falling. She announces the sky’s imminent collapse to all the animals she encounters. Soon Chicken Little and her friends get an invitation into a fox’s den to escape the danger. […] … learn more→

Restructure the Humanities Ph.D.

The Modern Language Association’s report on doctoral study in language and literature, released last month, does well to avoid framing the question of the humanities Ph.D. in terms of a \”crisis in the humanities.\” Instead, it focuses our attention where it belongs—on the underlying institutional structures that inhibit the evolution of the humanities Ph.D. The […] … learn more→

The other public Humanities

Among the conclusions frequently drawn about the heavily reported \”crisis in the humanities\” is that humanities departments are woefully out of touch—with today\’s students, with the new economy, with the public at large. The argument is a familiar one. In response to a similar climate of hostility in the late 1980s and early 90s, the […] … learn more→

The highly useful crisis in the Humanities

The cartoon cover of a 1935 issue of The Princeton Tiger humor magazine showed Depression-era graduates lined up at commencement to be handed a loaf of bread with every liberal-arts diploma. A few months later, the university\’s alumni magazine reported on students\’ shifting academic interests in a table titled, \”Trend Away From the Humanities.\” Majors […] … learn more→