Monthly Archives: August 2020

3 ways to study better, according to cognitive research

3 ways to study better, according to cognitive research

Whether you are a student or the parent of one contending with coronavirus school closures, this year “back to school” means studying under some unusual circumstances. Learning and teaching can provide great opportunities for academic and personal growth, but in the midst of stressors, it’s worth remembering that some ways of learning and retaining information are more […] … learn more→

I’m working 50 unpaid hours a week and I fear for my job

I’m working 50 unpaid hours a week and I fear for my job

The number of white people involved in the protests against the killing of George Floyd has been heartening. It echoes the words of sympathy that I often hear in university corridors about the discrimination that faculty of colour face, and I don’t doubt that it is genuine. But words are not nearly enough. Faculty of […] … learn more→

Videos won’t kill the uni lecture, but they will improve student learning and their marks

Videos won’t kill the uni lecture, but they will improve student learning and their marks

In response to COVID-19, almost every university has scrambled to move its teaching online. To do this, academics have been choosing between two approaches: live videoconferencing using tools such as Zoom, or pre-recording videos and posting to platforms such as YouTube. Previous reviews have shown videoconferences are an okay substitute for classes, but what about videos? […] … learn more→

Australia must not lose a generation of medical researchers

Australia must not lose a generation of medical researchers

According to the recently released Research Australia report, more than three-quarters of Australia’s early career researchers (ECRs) in medical science are employed on temporary contracts or as casuals. Those young postdoctoral researchers in their 20s and 30s are essentially serving apprenticeships, expected to produce publishable research while relying on short-duration contracts of usually one to […] … learn more→

The ‘later on’ PhD

The ‘later on’ PhD

It not unusual to think about the PhD as a seamless pathway from undergraduate to Grad School with maybe a Masters in between. But not all PhDers do go straight through. Many work, often for quite a long time, before they begin a doctorate. Some of these ’later-on’ doctorates are also undertaken part-time. People who do doctorates after […] … learn more→

5 reasons Chinese students may stop studying in the US

5 reasons Chinese students may stop studying in the US

Nearly 400,000 Chinese students were enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities in 2019 – more than one-third of the country’s international students. A sharp decline in the number of these students would spell financial trouble for U.S. colleges and universities, given that Chinese students spend US$15 billion in tuition payments. Their departure could also result in higher tuition for U.S.   […] … learn more→

Why Australian degree cost increases will hit women hardest

Why Australian degree cost increases will hit women hardest

The Australian federal government’s proposed increase in the cost of studying humanities and communications degrees at Australian universities has stirred much debate. One aspect that should not be overlooked is that these changes will disproportionately affect women. Under the proposed changes, student contributions for social science, communications and humanities (not including English and psychology) will increase […] … learn more→

Brain scientists haven’t been able to find major differences between women’s and men’s brains, despite over a century of searching

Brain scientists haven’t been able to find major differences between women’s and men’s brains, despite over a century of searching

People have searched for sex differences in human brains since at least the 19th century, when scientist Samuel George Morton poured seeds and lead shot into human skulls to measure their volumes. Gustave Le Bon found men’s brains are usually larger than women’s, which prompted Alexander Bains and George Romanes to argue this size difference makes men smarter. But John Stuart Mill pointed out, […] … learn more→

“Dad, why are you uploading that photo of me to Instagram?”: The risks of leaving the mark of minors online

Often the digital life of boys and girls begins before they start using the internet, even before they are born, with the dissemination of ultrasound images, an increasingly common family practice during pregnancy. Mother. The practice of fathers and mothers posting texts, images or videos of their sons and daughters on social networks is called sharenting . An anglicism […] … learn more→

“Neverland” or amnesic childhood

Is Peter Pan one of the last examples of the childhood cult that dominated the Victorian era? JM Barrie’s fable devalues ​​adult experience, but it does not idealize childhood. Both in his play ( Peter Pan, or the boy who would not grow up ( Peter Pan; or, The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up ) as in his novel, Peter and Wendy (1911), […] … learn more→